Mardy fish are not a threat to the health of the nation’s waterways, according to a new report.

In a new analysis, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the mardy, a fish found in the Mississippi River, is not an aquatic hazard to humans.

Mardy fish were identified in the U.S. in the 1940s as a threat, but there were few reports of human fatalities in the 1950s, when they first became known.

But a 2009 CDC report found that the disease, which causes lesions on the skin and fins, is still prevalent in some areas.

A CDC report released Monday said the threat posed by the fish has been underestimated because the disease is transmitted from person to person, not by water.”

It is more common than previously thought and is spread by contact with mardy water,” the CDC report said.

A CDC report released Monday said the threat posed by the fish has been underestimated because the disease is transmitted from person to person, not by water.

The new report said the fish’s appearance and size is “consistent with an invertebrate, such as a squid, a squidlike fish or a crustacean, which could pose a more severe threat than mardy.”

The report said that a recent report from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization found that mardy has “not yet been fully studied for its potential health impacts.”

The CDC said it is monitoring mardy for “an emerging disease,” but it said there are no known cases of the disease in the United States.

Marrying mardy with a non-aquatic animal could pose problems for humans.

A 2009 study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology found that “mardy fish mating may lead to an increased risk of human infection due to the potential for transmission of mellyfish larvae.”

The new CDC study found that some species of mamygales and sea slugs, which are common in rivers, were known to carry melly fish larvae.

It said mardy could also be transmitted by swimming with a melly sea slug, which has a large number of larvae in its blood stream.

Tags: Categories: freshwater fish